Pineapple (2020)

Drama, Romance, 13 mins

An ambitious artist gets jealous when her girlfriend creates an accidental masterpiece.

 

Taz’s pieces are ephemeral and easily erasable, quickly returning to the life from which they sprung

Set in the exclusive, and often male-dominated, world of London’s art scene, Max Lincoln’s Pineapple (2020) is a heart-warming narrative that tackles a range of subjects such as love, envy and art. As well as the intellectual questions that can haunt viewers long after they have finished the film, Pineapple is also a beautiful exploration of the unconditional love that can come under strain when forced to compete with a career.

The story begins when Taz (Cherrelle Skeete), an idle ex-dancer, paints her face while waiting for her girlfriend Jude (Natalie Simpson), an artist with an MA, to finish her work for an upcoming exhibition. While the gallery manager (Joseph Capp) threatens to abandon Jude’s paintings altogether because they are no longer “fun,” he is captivated by Taz’s accidental “masterpiece,” and offers her a place in the same exhibition. The film then explores Jude’s evident envy and sense of injustice as she grapples both with her girlfriend’s success and what she considers her own failure.

Filled with the bright colors that populate the art pieces, the film’s simple editing reflects the spontaneity and life that we sometimes seek to capture through art. In contrast to Jude’s paintings, Taz’s pieces are ephemeral and easily erasable, quickly returning to the life from which they sprung, and thus making them all the more attractive to an art critic who looks for that kind of vivacity. Although for Taz her face-paint was the result of a moment of boredom, for the gallery manager, it was something that could be rebranded and romanticized as a “Temple of Vision.” Lincoln is particularly successful in bringing out the question of the gaze in the art world – especially the male gaze – and the power it has to decide who is an artist and what is art.

This short film has a bit of everything: it’s got laughs, romance, paintings, and some hard-hitting critiques of the art world in which it’s set. The only thing it surprisingly doesn’t have is pineapples, but that is something that can be easily overlooked given the richness of the film. Make sure you’re one of the first to catch it, and let us know what you think!

This article was written by:

Isidora Cortes-Monroy

Isidora Cortes-Monroy

Reviewer, writer

Isidora has written for various student papers, offering articles from film reviews to opinion pieces that often had Latin American cultural events or productions as the focus of the piece.

She has just graduated from her MPhil in Comparative Literatures from the University of Cambridge, and will be going on to do her PhD in Hispanic Studies in Toronto.

She/Her

This article was written by:

Isidora Cortes-Monroy

Reviewer, and writer

Isidora has written for various student papers, offering articles from film reviews to opinion pieces that often had Latin American cultural events or productions as the focus of the piece.
She has just graduated from her MPhil in Comparative Literatures from Cambridge, and will be going on to do her PhD in Hispanic Studies at the University of Toronto.

She/Her